After Thwarted Kidnapping Plans, Whitmer Calls for Unity

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer addressed the State of Michigan after a plan to kidnap her and other Michigan government officials was thwarted by state and federal law enforcement agencies. She started by saying thank you to law enforcement and FBI agents who participated in stopping this [...]

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Saskatchewan mulls letting marriage celebrants reject gays

By |2018-01-16T12:33:31-05:00May 20th, 2010|News|

by Rex Wockner

International News Briefs

Saskatchewan’s Court of Appeal heard submissions May 13 and 14 on government initiatives that would permit marriage commissioners to refuse to marry same-sex couples.
The Canadian province’s justice ministry hopes the court will declare constitutional one or the other of two proposed laws that it asked the judges to review under the rarely used Constitutional Questions Act.
One measure would allow marriage commissioners to opt out of performing any marriage they object to for religious reasons. A second bill would do the same thing, but would apply only to commissioners who were appointed before same-sex marriage became legal in the province in 2004.
The provincial Human Rights Commission and the Court of Queen’s Bench previously ruled against a marriage commissioner who refused to perform his duties because of personal objections to homosexuality. Other, similar lawsuits are ongoing.
Canada’s Parliament made same-sex marriage the law of the land in 2005, by which time courts already had legalized gay marriage in nine of Canada’s 13 provinces and territories – everywhere but Alberta, the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Prince Edward Island.

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BTL Staff
Between The Lines has been publishing LGBTQ-related content in Southeast Michigan since the early '90s. This year marks the publication's 27th anniversary.