Name Change Project Arrives In Metro Detroit

BTL Staff
By | 2015-02-05T09:00:00+00:00 February 5th, 2015|Michigan, News|

BY BTL STAFF

METRO DETROIT – The Name Change Project, which provides legal name change services to transgender people, has arrived in Michigan.
In 10 other counties from around the country, the Name Change Project has helped many transgender people secure a legal name change. By partnering with law farms and corporate law departments from around the country, the project is made free for trans identified individuals.
Law firm Dykema Gossett will assist the Transgender Legal Defense and Education Fund (TLDEF) in the launch of the project’s newest chapter in Washtenaw, Oakland and Wayne Counties. TLDEF may also be able to assist residents in Macomb, Kent or Ingham County.
In Michigan, a name change is a much smoother process than changing gender on legal documents. According to the Mi.gov website, adults and children aged 14 years of age or older must submit a petition with the local family division of the circuit court in the county where they have lived for at least a year. A notice of the hearing of the name change will be posted, allowing for creditors and individuals with the same name the opportunity to object; the judge will then question why the individual wants to change their name.
If over the age of 21, the individual must obtain fingerprints from their local police department and have a criminal history check by the Michigan State Police and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. A petition by a minor who is 14 years or older must be signed by all available parents or legal guardians.
The entire process can cost around $350 and be both confusing and time-consuming. The use of a legal team is highly recommended to expedite the process.
Visit the TLDEF website http://www.transgenderlegal.org/headline_show.php?id=567 for more information or email them at info@transgenderlegal.org.

About the Author:

BTL Staff
Between The Lines has been publishing LGBTQ-related content in Southeast Michigan since the early '90s. This year marks the publication's 25th anniversary.