Art & Around

By |2017-10-31T06:24:04-04:00October 31st, 2017|Uncategorized|
UMS presents unique one-man show by inventive Canadian theater artist Robert Lepage

ANN ARBOR – The University Musical Society closes its 04/05 theater series with four performances of the internationally celebrated one-man production “The Far Side of the Moon,” written and directed by Canadian visionary Robert Lepage with music by Laurie Anderson, and featuring actor Yves Jacques. The production runs at the Power Center for the Performing Arts on Thursday, March 10 through Sunday, March 14, with performances on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m.
“After we probed it, mapped it and visited it, our interest in the moon diminished considerably,” says director Robert Lepage. “Already in the early 1970s, the last Apollo missions didn’t even make it to television. Still, even though the moon has lost a lot of its mystery, it has lost none of its poetic force. By turning my attention towards certain moments of the space race, I was forced to revisit my childhood and an important part of my teenage years. I had been trying to push back that moment for a long time, but creating this new play left me no choice. The most difficult part for me was certainly when I realized that my younger years, which I believed to be a sunny time in my life, were more often than not set in moon-like colors – blues and grays. I hope that my clumsily disguised story can touch you and bring you a bit of lunar nostalgia.”
Tickets to the event are $26 – $42.
For tickets or additional information, contact the University Musical Society at 734-764-2538 or online at http://www.ums.org.

Rackham Symphony Choir provides stirring look into the power of music

DETROIT – Highlighting the universal themes of the invincible human spirit and the power of art, Rackham Symphony Choir is proud to announce its March 13 presentations of Donald McCullough’s “Holocaust Cantata.”
The stirring work is created from collected songs and letters written by World War II concentration camp prisoners and shows that music and poetry can sometimes be the only bright spot in an otherwise bleak landscape.
There are two performances on Sunday, March 13. The 2 p.m. performance is at the Holocaust Memorial Center, located at 28123 Orchard Lake, Farmington Hills. There will be an opening address by Rabbi Charles H. Rosenzveig. Tickets can be purchased at the center, by phone or through Rackham Choir at 313-272-0334. Tickets are $20 each or $15 for students with valid identification.
The evening performance takes place at 7 p.m. at Beth Ahm Synagogue, 5075 West Maple Road, West Bloomfield. Tickets are $20 each or $15 for students with valid identification. Purchases can be made by phoning 313-272-0334.
Portions of the proceeds at each location will benefit the Holocaust Memorial Center and Beth Ahm Synagogue and the Walter and Regina Litt Family Jewish Music Fund of Beth Ahm respectively.
Information about Rackham Symphony Choir is available at http://www.rackhamchoir.org.

Exhibit explores work of missionaries in India and Central America

BIRMINGHAM – The Great Frame Up of Birmingham is pleased to present “A Photographic Exhibition from the Mission Fields of the Tsunami and Beyond.” The photographs are all taken by the missionaries themselves working in India and Central America. Their uniquely compassionate perspective is clear.
The exhibition is on display at The Great Frame Up of Birmingham, 215 Peabody, through March 16.
For information call 248-540-2555 or go online to http://www.birmingham.thegreatframeup.com.

Japanese dance form, Butoh, comes to UICA

GRAND RAPIDS – The newest installment of Butoh will be held at the Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts on Saturday, March 5 at 8 p.m.
UICA’s resident performance art company, X Performance Group, specializes in the Japanese dance form, Butoh, described as provocative, physical, spiritual, cosmic, cathartic and mysterious.
X Performance Group annually performs Butoh at UICA, the only known Butoh dance troupe in Michigan. The performers use their bodies to reveal hidden emotions by developing the ability to tune into the body’s inner senses, to be sensitive to fluctuations of energy and to explore the relationship to the space around them. Rather than aspiring to an aesthetic ideal, the dancers attempt to bare their souls to reveal the human being in its banality, ugliness and grotesqueness, and to expose the sufferings and joys of life.
Tickets are $15 for the general public.
UICA is located at 41 Sheldon Blvd. SE in Grand Rapids. It is Michigan’s largest multidisciplinary arts center offering programs in visual arts, performance art, music, dance, literature and film.
For more information, call 616-454-7000 or go online to http://www.uica.org.

Throw on your kilt and head to the ‘British Isles Spectacular’

DEARBORN – The Motor City Brass Band presents its much anticipated “British Isles Spectacular” on Saturday, March 5 at 8 p.m., featuring Amy Nelson, cornet virtuoso. This will be the 40-member Band’s third performance out of the four concert series at the Ford Community and Performing Arts Center in Dearborn.
Tickets are $12 for adults, $10 for seniors and students, and FREE for children under 12.
For tickets or other information, call the Ford Community and Performing Arts Center box office at 313-943-2354.

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