After Thwarted Kidnapping Plans, Whitmer Calls for Unity

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer addressed the State of Michigan after a plan to kidnap her and other Michigan government officials was thwarted by state and federal law enforcement agencies. She started by saying thank you to law enforcement and FBI agents who participated in stopping this [...]

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By |2003-04-03T09:00:00-05:00April 3rd, 2003|Uncategorized|

Brothers and Others in Arms: The Making of Love and War in Israeli Combat Units, by Danny Kaplan. Harrington Park Press, 278 pages, $19.95 paper.
Unlike several of this publisher’s recent military-themed titles, which are mainly fantasy fodder for guys with a yen for men with guns, “Brothers and Others in Arms” offers substantial food for thought. The first third of Kaplan’s insightful study consists of first-person interviews with Israeli combat veterans. With slangy vernacular intact, these voices are more ruminative than naughty in nature – but they leave no doubt that homosexuality and homoerotic play are an integral component of the Israeli military environment. Building on the factual yet often emotional anecdotes, Kaplan – a military veteran and an Israel-based psychologist focusing on gay experiences – uses the academic tools of cultural, historical, and sociological analyses to contrast the more tolerant Israeli take on gays in the military with the hidebound hypocrisy of the U.S. experience. Among his many substantive (and heavily footnoted) observations is that queers in the Israeli ranks – even in the showers – don’t diminish unit morale or combat effectiveness; both suppositions, of course, are at the hysterical core of American military homophobia.

About the Author:

BTL Staff
Between The Lines has been publishing LGBTQ-related content in Southeast Michigan since the early '90s. This year marks the publication's 27th anniversary.