Flint Institute of Arts Celebrates MLK Day With Free Museum Admission, Virtual Celebration Options

By |2021-01-18T09:37:04-05:00January 18th, 2021|Michigan, News|

While the novel coronavirus pandemic has made it much harder to celebrate and acknowledge holidays, this year the Flint Institute of Arts is making the socially distanced observance of Martin Luther King Day much easier with free admission.

“We encourage you to visit and explore the galleries as we seek to reflect, re-examine, and move forward as a nation,” read the FIA site. “Martin Luther King Jr’s message of equality resonates even more, this year. The FIA’s mission is clear, to advance the understanding and appreciation of art FOR ALL through collections, exhibitions, and educational programs.”

Attendees are encouraged not only to enjoy the museum’s general exhibits but to take time to explore the ones highlighting African American history and the nation’s civil rights movement.

And, for those who would like to observe the holiday at home, the Flint Public Library has created a virtual retrospective program to highlight King’s life and work.

“Flint Public Library has celebrated the life of Dr. King for more than 30 years, and this year is no exception. We will present a virtual retrospective program, The Best of M.L. King Day, with new presentations from the young men of The Institute of R.H.Y.M.E.S. (Reaching and Helping Young Minorities Excel and Succeed),” read the FIA site. “This program will, of course, be offered virtually via Zoom. You can find the Zoom link on our website the day of the performance.”

The FIA highlighted its dedication to education on this day with this quote from Dr. King:

“If you can’t fly then run, if you can’t run then walk, if you can’t walk then crawl, but whatever you do you have to keep moving forward.”

Learn more about the FIA’s and Flint Public Library’s exhibits both online and in-person on this page.

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Between The Lines has been publishing LGBTQ-related content in Southeast Michigan since the early '90s. This year marks the publication's 27th anniversary.