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NOGLSTP Seeks LGBTQ Scholarship Applicants

By |2020-05-11T12:46:45-04:00May 11th, 2020|National, News|

The National Organization of Gay and Lesbian Scientists and Technical Professionals is seeking applicants for the 2020/2021 school year to receive its Out to Innovate Scholarship. Any two undergraduate and graduate students pursuing a career in a STEM-related field at an accredited U.S. college or university are being offered the $5,ooo scholarship. In addition to this, two undergraduate students pursuing an electrical engineering degree are being offered a scholarship for $2,500 through the new David McLennan Memorial Scholarship. All applicants for the Out to Innovate Scholarship will be considered for the David McLennan Memorial Scholarship, so there is no need to apply twice. Applications for the scholarships opened up April 1, however, the window for applications to be turned in will stay open until June 6.

To be eligible, applicants must have

  • Successfully completed two years of post-high school education at an accredited college or university in the U.S.
  • Maintained a minimum G.P.A. of 3.0 throughout the entirety of college enrollment
  • Declared a major in the STEM field
  • Been active in the LGBTQ community by joining organizations and groups that promote queer involvement
  • Eligible for fall term registration and not be under disciplinary sanction

In years prior, the scholarships were only granted towards two students a year, one undergraduate and one graduate. However, due to extra funding in the past two years and the difficulty of just finding one winner, each runner-up applicant was able to receive a second-place scholarship of $2,500. Rochelle Diamond, a board member of NOGLSTP who helps sort through the applications, has suggested that for the 2020/2021 school year there could be upwards of six applicants being awarded scholarships.

“It makes our hearts swell to put together what we have so they can meet ends,” Diamond said.

Throughout NOGLSTP’s 10 years of giving, the organization has been trying to increase the amount of applications that are given out. Completely volunteer-run, all of NOGLSTP’s scholarships are funded by donors. A professional society for STEM since 1979, the organization has been representing all members of the queer community in STEM for years and gives all scholarship applicants free membership to the professional society.

In addition to the scholarships and membership to NOGLSTP, the students get the ability to travel to a professional development meeting of their choice in the winner. This can either be one that NOGLSTP puts together or one focused more on their specific curriculum. Later this month, the organization is putting together a mentoring program by partnering with Great Minds in STEM. It will be an internet platform where students can be taught more information on what to focus on when pursuing a career in STEM, with more specific ins and outs of resume making, job interviews and more.

For more information on the scholarships and the application process visit noglstp.org/programs-projects/scholarships/  

About the Author:

Eve Kucharski
As news and feature editor at Between The Lines, Eve Kucharski's work has spanned the realms of current events and entertainment. She's chatted with stars like Wanda Sykes, Margaret Cho and Tyler Oakley as well as political figures like Gloria Steinem, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and Attorney General Dana Nessel. Her coverage of the November 2018 elections was also featured in a NowThis News report.