Project Healthy Living returns to metro Detroit

BTL Staff
By | 2010-08-26T09:00:00-04:00 August 26th, 2010|Guides|

Project Health Living Fall 2010 Schedule

10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sept. 14, Southfield Civic Center., 26000 Evergreen, Southfield
12-6 p.m. Sept. 15, Southfield Civic Center., 26000 Evergreen, Southfield
12-6 p.m. Sept. 16, Macomb Mall, 32233 Gratiot Ave., Roseville
10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sept. 17-18, Macomb Mall, 32233 Gratiot Ave., Roseville
10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sept. 22-23, Eastland Mall, 18000 Vernier, Harper Woods
12-6 p.m. Sept. 24-25, Eastland Mall, 18000 Vernier, Harper Woods
6 a.m.-2 p.m. Sept. 28, Northwest Activities Center., 18100 Meyers Road, Detroit
10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sept. 30, Westland Mall, 35000 W. Warren, Westland
10 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 1, Westland Mall, 35000 W. Warren, Westland
12-6 p.m. Oct. 2, Westland Mall 35000 W. Warren, Westland
10 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 13-15, Macomb Mall, 32233 Gratiot Ave., Roseville
12-6 p.m. Oct. 16, Macomb Mall, 32233 Gratiot Ave., Roseville

On Sept. 14 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m., the Southfield Civic Center will play host to the kick-off event marking the return of Project Healthy Living. The event is free and open to the public.
United Health Organization, a non-profit group that coordinates body wellness checks and community-wide health screenings, is slated to hold its 2010 season of events featuring low-cost health services and screenings at a host of mega-sites around metro Detroit throughout September and October.
Though traditionally held in the spring, UHO made the switch to fall this year. “Participants will find a wide range of community and health related resources at Project Healthy Living this year,” said Ifetayo B. Johnson, executive director of UHO. “(Holding fall dates) will provide an opportunity for our participants to get flu and pneumonia shots at some of our sites.”
Also new this year, the fee schedule has been changed for the first time in six years. For $50, a new blood screening service will be offered. The 26-profile blood analysis screens for asymptomatic diseases that effect kidney and liver function. It has an estimated retail value of over $700.
All Project Healthy Living events are free and open to the public. Many of the basic screenings for obesity, hypertension, body composition, vision and hearing are free. For a nominal cost, new blood screenings for vitamin D deficiency, glucose levels, and comprehensive blood screening will also be offered. Other low-cost health screenings measure participant’s risk for H. Pylori, stroke, heart attack and low bone density. Lab services are provided by Quest Diagnostic Laboratories. Persons must be at least 18 years of age to participate, or be accompanied by a guardian.
“When the bottom fell out of the economy, UHO instituted a price freeze because we realized that wages were stagnant during this time of economic stress. In fact, last year we rolled several more tests into the blood analysis service at no additional cost,” Johnson explained of the raised costs, adding that UHO’s fees for services typically cost a fraction of the retail value. “It’s like getting 80 to 95-percent off for nearly all our blood work. You can’t beat the savings.”
She added that exhibitors will be on hand to answer questions about nutrition and offer tips on physical and emotional fitness. Attendees are encouraged to pursue healthy lifestyles. “Project Healthy Living is not a replacement for medical treatment,” Johnson stressed. “That’s why we always encourage participants to follow-up with their family physician.”
The 2010 Project Healthy Living season extends Sept. 14 through Oct. 16. Beginning Sept. 8, the project hotline will operate Monday through Friday, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
For more information about the new fee schedule and the availability of specific free and low-cost tests, call the project’s hotline at 313-531-9108. To learn how to support United Health Organization and Project Healthy Living, call the hotline or visit http://www.projecthealthyliving.net.

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BTL Staff
Between The Lines has been publishing LGBTQ-related content in Southeast Michigan since the early '90s. This year marks the publication's 25th anniversary.