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Queer Things To Do Right Now-ish: Enjoy Coming Out Day (with Cake), Support Trans Youth, Celebrate Princesses

By |2022-09-22T13:23:01-04:00September 22nd, 2022|Michigan, News|

It’s fall, bitches. And that means two things: winter is coming (so get out now before hibernation is upon us), and self-care just got a whole lot cuter. Who isn’t adorable strolling around in a cozy cardigan sipping a hot mug of Earl Grey? 

Celebrate the all-too-brief Michigan autumn at a King Princess concert, support a local Black- and queer-owned bakery, pick up a book for cozy couch time — or do the opposite by joining a queer sports team. 

1. National Coming Out Day

Since the first National Coming Out Day was observed in 1988, queer culture in America has evolved and changed many times over, but it’s still not easy for every queer person to come out as their authentic selves — especially in today’s heated political climate. This unofficial holiday is a chance to recognize the sometimes painful journey many queer people have to endure on their way to living authentically and to lend support to people bravely coming out for the first time. 

National Coming Out Day falls on Oct. 11, the anniversary of the 1987 National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights, and the holiday was the impetus behind many Pride festivals, including OUTFest, which later became Ann Arbor Pride. Above all, the founders said, this day is focused on the idea that homophobia thrives where there is silence and ignorance. 

2. See King Princess Royally Rock

King Princess. Photo: Collier Schorr

In some ways, King Princess is a study in the pointlessness of labels. The artist identifies outside the binary, somewhere between male and female, and her music isn’t easily categorized, either. Is it folk? Indie pop? Hard rock? Sadcore? Yes, yes, yes — and sometimes, yes. That, too. 

King Princess’ second album, “Hold On Baby,” dives deep into her queer identity — a coda, in a way, to her 2018 debut single, “1950,” where the musician’s infectious, bouncy chorus belied a nagging truth about navigating the world as a queer person: “I hate it when dudes try to chase me/But I love it when you try to save me.”  

Catch King Princess Oct. 9 at The Fillmore in Detroit. Tickets available at ticketmaster.com.

3. Get Those Fall Comfort Calories (While Helping Your Community)

April Anderson and Michelle Anderson, Owners of Good Cakes and Bakes. Photo: goodcakesandbakes.com

Now that the thermometer has taken a distinct dive into sweater weather, it’s time for some comfort baking. Better yet, leave the comfort baking to the experts at Detroit’s Good Cakes and Bakes, the lesbian-owned bakery that made headlines in 2020 when it received a cake order with a homophobic message. The owners, pastry chef April and her wife, Michelle Anderson, agreed to fill the order without the requested message. When it came time for pick up, dozens of Pride Flag-waving supporters showed up to rally behind the Andersons (though the “customer” never did). 

Sometimes, the good side wins — and you will, too, because in addition to the infusion of love and inclusion, the cake is on point (and organic and vegan, too, if you prefer).

Good Cakes & Bakes is located at 19363 Livernois Ave. Visit goodcakesandbakes.com for hours. 

4. Support Trans Youth During Trans Empowerment Month 

It’s an incredibly important time to support the transgender community, and that includes lifting up trans youth. Stand with Trans has been a leader on this front since 2015, connecting trans youth with supportive resources, fierce advocacy and events aimed at fostering young trans adults. 

The organization will host its annual Trans Empowerment Month Oct. 5-30 and invites trans and non-binary youth (up to age 24) to attend a series of free events, including workshops, panels and performances, online and in-person. Allies are welcome, too, for a modest fee. 

Learn more at standwithtrans.org/TEM.

5. Go ‘Beyond the Tiara’

Cozy up with a fascinating new read or liven up your very gay monthly book club with “Disney Princess: Beyond the Tiara” by Emily Zemler. The book explores the history of these larger-than-life characters, which have had an outsize impact on pop culture well beyond the big screen. Zemler interviewed Disney notables like Alan Manken, who has composed music for nine Disney films, including “The Little Mermaid,” and Lea Salonga, who voiced Princess Jasmine in “Aladdin” and Mulan.  

Connect with your favorite independent bookstore to find your copy — consider Detroit’s queer-owned 27th Letter Books or Black Stone Bookstore and Cultural Center in Ypsilanti. 

About the Author:

Sarah Bricker Hunt, a proud Eastern Michigan University alum, is a freelance writer and editor who dabbles in a little of everything.