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She Said

By | 2008-03-20T09:00:00-04:00 March 20th, 2008|Opinions|

compiled by Howard Israel

“Finally, colleges are coming out of the closet and being visible in the recruitment process to seek LGBT students. Even the nations top colleges realize that being LGBT-friendly is not only in the best interest of enrolment figures but also a necessity to prepare for a smaller, more diverse student population in the future.”
– Shane Windmeyer, Executive Director of Campus Pride, the national organization for LGBT students and campus groups, http://NationalGayNews.com, Mar. 12, 2008. Nearly 30 colleges have registered for Campus Pride’s LGBT-friendly college fair and over 150 colleges and universities are reaching out to LGBT students through the LGBT-Friendly Campus Climate Index.

“The homosexual lobby has been extremely effective in aligning itself with minority groups. It is ever-present at the service each year for the Holocaust memorial – as if to create for themselves the image of a group of people under persecution. We neglect the gay movement at our peril. There is a giant conspiracy against Christian values, an agenda here. These groups are defending their position, I am defending mine. It is all about a lifestyle alien to the Christian tradition. Anything which attacks the sanctity of marriage and the family will be opposed by the church.”
-Bishop Joseph Devine, remarks made in a lecture in Glasgow, Scotland, titled “Christian faith and inconvenient questions”, http://SFGate.com, Mar. 14, 2008

“It is important to remember all the victims of the Holocaust be they Jewish, disabled, gay or lesbian people. [Remembering the Holocaust] is about learning the lessons of the past to encourage society to tackle all forms of prejudice, including anti-Semitism, racism and homophobia.”
– Christine Shaw, head of U. K.’s Holocaust Memorial Day Trust, commenting on the remarks made by Bishop Joseph Devine in a lecture in Glasgow, Scotland titled “Christian faith and inconvenient questions”, http://SFGate.com, Mar. 14, 2008

I think this season of Project Runway deserves huge credit for being unapologetic in its inclusion of a whole host of different gay contestants, and of course the fatherly influence of Tim Gunn and Michael Kors. I’m sure there will be many younger viewers in particular, both gay and straight, who will take inspiration from the show and recognize that you don’t have to fit a certain mould if you are gay even if you are into fashion.
– Eddy Evans, blogger, writing about this season’s “Project Runway” on Bravo, http://fhoutfront.com, Mar. 13, 2008

“I thought the word ‘loving’ was important – to be a normal way of self-reference, a normal way of contextualizing your sexuality and giving you a sense of internal affirmation of your loving. I never felt fully affirmed, if affirmed at all, by gay culture. Many blacks feel similarly. We need a terminology and a way of being that came from us and that affirms us. ‘Same-gender loving’ should not be interpreted as ‘just another way of saying gay’. Changes in terminology often make marginalized groups more digestible to mainstream society – it’s easier to lobby for gay foster parents than for sodomite adoption. The term same-gender loving has had a similar affect on black heterosexuals”
– Cleo Manago, CEO, AmAASI Health & Cultural Centers in LA, commenting on the continuous evolution of terms used to describe the diversity of the gay community, in an article titled “Does gay ‘diversity’ require new terms?”, Southern Voice, Mar. 14, 2008. Cleo Manago is credited with developing the “same-gender loving” term and identity for black people in the early 1990s.

“The Iranian authorities found out that I am a homosexual and they are looking for me. I cannot stop my attraction towards men. This is something that I will have to live with the rest of my life. I was born with the feeling and cannot change this fact but it is unfortunate that I cannot express my feeling in Iran. If I return to Iran I will be arrested and executed like my former boyfriend.”
– Mehdi Kazemi, 19-year-old, faces the death penalty if he is forced to return to Iran, has won a temporary reprieve from the British Home Secretary, The Independent.UK, March 14, 2008. Kazemi’s deceased boyfriend was arrested by the Iranian state police for being gay, named Kazemi as his boyfriend, and was executed for sodomy.

About the Author:

BTL Staff
Between The Lines has been publishing LGBTQ-related content in Southeast Michigan since the early '90s. This year marks the publication's 27th anniversary.