After Thwarted Kidnapping Plans, Whitmer Calls for Unity

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer addressed the State of Michigan after a plan to kidnap her and other Michigan government officials was thwarted by state and federal law enforcement agencies. She started by saying thank you to law enforcement and FBI agents who participated in stopping this [...]

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New Buenos Aires mayor was once anti-gay

By |2017-10-31T14:58:55-04:00October 31st, 2017|News|

Newly elected Buenos Aires Mayor Mauricio Macri once told a daily newspaper that gay people are sick.
In a 1997 interview with Pagina/12, Macri was asked if he’d accept gay players on the Boca Juniors soccer team he owns.
He answered: “This situation hasn’t come up. It’s a complicated situation. It’s a sickness. This is not a 100 percent healthy person. … It’s an undesirable deviation.”
The interviewer responded that seeing homosexuality as a sickness is “a bit of an old-fashioned idea.”
And Macri replied: “Would you be happy if your son were homosexual? Please. The world has made us so we join with a woman. Why are we going to join with a man?”
By last month, however, Macri had moderated his stance. Answering a candidate questionnaire from the organization Argentina Homosexual Community, Macri said, “Society as a whole needs public campaigns that discourage and condemn all types of violence and discrimination, and that includes sexual orientation.”
But Macri was otherwise very cautious in answering several specific questions, choosing to speak against discrimination in general and not committing to any other specific actions on behalf of LGLBT people.
– Reported by Rex Wockner

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BTL Staff
Between The Lines has been publishing LGBTQ-related content in Southeast Michigan since the early '90s. This year marks the publication's 27th anniversary.